PFPC Admin

PFPC Admin

Wednesday, 12 December 2012 00:00

Emerging Security Challenges Video

Wednesday, 12 December 2012 00:00

Education Development Working Group Video

Wednesday, 16 July 2014 00:00

About the Partnership for Peace Consortium

Wednesday, 10 December 2014 00:00

Meet our Team

Our Team

The Partnership for Peace Consortium is a network of over 100 experts in international security and related fields. We wish we could show the entire team, but in the meantime you can meet our operations staff, who runs the consortium's activities.

 Raphael Perl

Raphael Perl

Executive Director

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Olaf Garlich

Deputy Executive Director

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 Donelly Maria 1

Maria Donnelly

International Program Manager

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Zoltan Homonnay

International Program Manager

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Juergen Eise

International Program Manager Assistant*

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Elena Danilov

Operations Specialist*

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Markus Morgner

Program Assistant

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*=Contractor

Tuesday, 09 December 2014 00:00

Senior Advisory Council

The Partnership for Peace Consortium is governed by a Senior Advisory Council (SAC) consisting of representatives from: (1) Austria, (2) Canada, (3) Germany, (4) NATO, (5) Poland, (6) Sweden, (7) Switzerland and (8) the United States. SAC members may occupy permanent or rotating membership, depending on the wishes of the member.

The SAC meets annually to guide the PfPC's strategic direction. On a more frequent basis working level SAC members meet to ensure the PfPC's engagement activities are consistent with high-level SAC guidance.

If your country or organization is interested in becoming a SAC member, please contact us today so we can begin a dialogue. We look forward to hearing from you!

This document is the result of the best intentions of a multinational team of civilian and military academics (See pages 167-169 in the curriculum for the list of names) drawn from 13 countries. The aim of this document is modest. It does not pretend to be comprehensive nor does it purport to be the last word on NCO professional military education. Rather, this document aims to serve as a reference, a starting off place, for individuals or organisations in NATO member states and partner countries looking to develop and/or supplement their NCO professional military education (PME).

This document is the result of the best intentions of a multinational team of academics (See pgs 93-94 in the curriculum for list of academics) drawn from 11 countries. Typically, every document has an underlying reason for its existence and this one is no exception. The aim of this document is modest. It does not pretend to be comprehensive nor does it purport to be the last word on officer professional military education. Rather, this document seeks to serve as a reference, a starting off place, for individuals or organizations in partner countries looking to develop or to approximate officer professional military education (PME) curriculum in western military academies.

This brief examines policy issues associated with Emerging Security Challenges and offers considerations for response.Innovation cannot be controlled but risk can be managed and mitigated. Throughout the 20th and emerging 21st century, governments have systematically underestimated the disruption possible from technology and scientific advances.
”Emerging Security Challenges” is an all-encompassing term used to describe a set of non-traditional threats and risks that increasingly impact our security policy agendas. Many of these are linked to new or evolving technologies – requiring careful consideration of their potential implications. Addressing such issues requires knowing and understanding new technologies and – in particular – the way in which they impact security policy making. This is easier said than done, as there is constant and rapid innovation which policy makers have to be aware and keep track of. Developments in remote warfare, 3D-printing, nanotechnology, big data, and the “Internet of things” are all dependent on advances in information technology that herald potentially disruptive political and societal change.
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